Page Title
A Lutheran Church in the
Evangelical Catholic Tradition
A Lutheran Church in the
Evangelical Catholic Tradition
The Augustana Catholic Church
A Lutheran Church in the
Evangelical Catholic Tradition
A Lutheran Church
in the Catholic Tradition
The ACC consists of two dioceses: The Dioceses of the East and the
of the West. The Diocese of the East includes not only the Eastern half
of the United States, but also has jurisdiction over the clergy and the
faithful in Europe and in Africa.

This Church considers Lutherans to be Catholics in a temporary,
involuntary schism imposed on them by the Roman Catholic Church
when Father Martin Luther's attempt to start a renewal movement
within and for the Roman Catholic Church slipped out of his control.
This Church teaches that Lutheranism in general is a form of
non-Roman Catholicism. It considers the other Lutheran Churches to
be "Protestant" only to the extent that they have accepted insights from
the Calvinist and Zwinglian phases of the Reformation.

The Augustana Catholic Church accepts the unaltered Augsburg
Confession (in Latin
Confessio Augustana), the Apology of the
Augsburg Confession, and Martin Luther's Small Catechism insofar
as they are trustworthy witnesses to the Gospel and in accord with
authentic Catholic Faith and Tradition. Insofar as they are in accord
with authentic Catholic Faith and Tradition, the ACC recognizes the
remainder of The Book of Concord except the Formula of Concord
insofar as they are trustworthy witnesses to the Gospel and in accord
with authentic Catholic Faith and Tradition. The ACC does not accept
the final document in The Book of Concord, i.e., The Formula of
Concord, but recognizes and respects it as a historical Lutheran
document. The ACC has accepted major modifications in
Sacramental Theology and Principles of Church Government from the
(Lutheran) Church of Sweden, the Oxford Movement of the Anglican
Communion, and the documents and teachings of the Magisterium of
the Roman Catholic Church which includes the Catechism of the
Catholic Church (1994).

This Church is unique among Lutheran Churches in that it accepts as
additional confessional documents, the "Articles of Religion" from the
"Book of Common Prayer" as interpreted by John Henry Cardinal
Newman in "Tracts for the Times" (insofar as they do not conflict with
authentic Catholic faith and tradition), the Roman Catholic - Lutheran
"Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification" (Augsburg,
Germany, 1999); the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and the
documents and decrees of all Ecumenical Councils recognized by the
Roman Catholic Church. The ACC's strongest connections are with
the Roman Catholic Church, and some form of visible, corporate unity
with that Church is the ecumenical goal of the ACC.

The Augustana Catholic Church accepts Papal Primacy and Papal
Infallibility, but is not legally under Papal authority at this time. The
Augustana Catholic Church is theologically and socially conservative,
with the same view of the nature and authority of Scripture as the
Roman Catholic Church.

The polity of the Augustana Catholic Church is episcopal rather than
congregationalist, and follows the model of the Roman Catholic
Church.

The Augustana Catholic Church has never had female clergy for the
same reasons the Roman Catholic Church rejects the ordination of
women; and has placed a moratorium on the ordination of women
until such time as it is ordered by a Pope (for the diaconate) or an
Ecumenical Council (for the priesthood and episcopacy). The ACC
has the same policy on the ordination of homosexuals as does the
Roman Catholic Church as defined by Pope Benedict XVI. This
Church does not permit the blessing of same-sex unions.

The clergy of the Augustana Catholic Church have all been ordained
(or re-ordained) in the historic Apostolic Succession, which it obtained
from the Ecumenical Catholic Diocese of the Americas and the
Apostolic Episcopal Church. The primary Apostolic Lineage of the The
Anglo-Lutheran Catholic Church is the Duarte Costa lineage of the
Rebiban or Vatican Succession. All ordinations are performed using
the rites of the most current edition of the Ordinal from The Pontifical of
the Roman Catholic Church set within a celebration of the Mass using
the Eucharistic rites of the Roman Catholic Church.

The worship of the Augustana Catholic Church is dignified and
sacramental. It differs from other Lutheran Churches by recognizing
and celebrating seven sacraments (Baptism, Holy Communion,
Confirmation, Reconciliation/Penance, Unction, Holy
Matrimony/Marriage, and Holy Orders/Ordination). The primary liturgy
of the ACC is the Roman Catholic Anglican Use Book of Divine
Worship. Any other rites approved and authorized for use by the
appropriate Congregation of the Curia of the Roman Catholic Church
may also be used by ACC clergy.


To go to the ACC's website, click

To go to the Vatican's website, click
here.
Our Metropolitan Archbishop,
the M. Rev. Robert Edmondson
The Augustana Catholic Church is a Church in the Lutheran
Evangelical Catholic tradition. The ACC was founded as the
"Evangelical Community Church - Lutheran (ECCL)" in 1997 by
former members of the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod. Its
headquarters is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
The ACC is governed by the
Metropolitan Archbishop. He is
assisted by the Synod of Bishops of
the Church which is concerned with
matters of doctrine and polity) and a
National Standing Committee which
includes lay members and is
concerned with temporal
administration and finance. The ACC
operates in accordance with the
Canon Law Code of the Roman
Catholic Church (1983) in areas not
covered by its own Canon Law Code
or that of the Augustana Evangelical
Catholic Communion (AECC), of
which it is a member.
Christ Lutheran Church - ALCC
826 West Central Avenue, Davidsonville, MD 21035
Church Office: 237 Chatham Lane, Annapolis, MD 21403
Tel: (410) 268-1858, E-mail: info@christalcc.org
Holy Mass:
Sunday at 10:30 a.m.,
afterwards Coffee Hour
in the Church Library

Sacrament of
Reconciliation offered
daily by appointment
here.
A Lutheran Church
in the Catholic Tradition